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Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

to the beginning of the race. And in that line there are influences for 

good and evil, awaiting favorable environment for awakening into new 

life unless restrained by the will of the individual. 

 

As Shute says: "There will come a time when the fertilized ovum will 

have a highly complex nucleus composed of many different ancestral 

groups of hereditary units. One often hears the expression that a child 

is a chip of the old block; but this is only a very partial truth, for 

the child is pre-eminently a composite chip of many old blocks." And 

Luther Burbank has well said: "Heredity means much; but what is 

heredity? Not some hideous ancestral spectre, forever crossing the path 

of a human being. Heredity is simply the sum of all the environments of 

all past generations on the responsive ever-moving life-forces." 

 

 

Transmission of Acquired Characteristics. 

 

One of the great disputes of biology is that concerning the question of 

whether or not parents may transmit to their offspring their personal 

"acquired characteristics" as well as those inherited from their line of 

ancestors. One side of the controversy points to the observed cases of 

children and grandchildren resembling each other, physically, mentally, 

and morally, in acquired characteristics; but the other side explains 

these facts as due to environment rather than to heredity. 

 

The best authorities seem to favor a middle-view, holding that acquired 

characteristics may be and are transmitted as "tendencies" in the 

offspring. Thus as each succeeding generation manifests the acquired 

tendency, it adds a cumulative force to the family heredity. At the same 

time they hold that "environment" is needed to "draw out" the inherited 

"tendency." For instance, a child born with evil tendencies, and placed 

in an evil environment, will most likely manifest evil conduct. The same 

child, if placed in a good environment, will not have the evil 

tendencies "drawn out" by the environment, and will probably not 

manifest evil conduct. The same rule applies to the child drawn with 

good "tendencies." In short, it is held that heredity and environment 

tend to balance each other--the "something within" is called out (or not 

called out) by the "something without." The life of the individual is 

held to be a continuous action and reaction between heredity and 

environment, and both of these elements must be taken into consideration 

when we think of the subject. 

 

Shute says: "As influencing a man's life and character, which is the 

strongest factor, heredity or environment?" In our opinion, as the 


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