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Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

result of long study and reading, where we have an average man of a 

sound mind in a sound body, there environment will be the strongest 

factor whether for good or evil--that is, in men in general, who have no 

organic defect, such as insanity or idiocy, and allied affections, the 

stronger force is environment; but in those having such defect, heredity 

is the controlling power, and we may add, the destroying power. 

 

 

The Eugenic Rule Regarding Heredity. 

 

It is one of the cardinal principles of Eugenics that those with a bad 

family history should not become parents. By this it is not meant that 

the manifestation of undesirable tendencies, physical, mental, and 

moral, on the part of certain individuals of a family necessarily 

constitutes a "bad family history." On the contrary, many of the best 

families have, from time to time, individuals who manifest undesirable 

tendencies, and who are in general out of harmony with the general 

family standard. It is an old axiom that "there is a black sheep in 

every flock"; and the flock must be measured by its general standard, 

and not by its exceptional black sheep. 

 

A "bad family history" is one in which the family has clearly manifested 

certain undesirable physical, mental, and moral traits in a marked 

degree, and in a sufficient number of instances to establish a standard. 

Some families have a "bad family history" for inebriety; others 

for epilepsy; others for licentiousness; others for dishonesty--the 

history extending over several generations, and including a marked 

number of individuals in each generation. Individuals of such a family 

should refrain from bearing children; and if children be born to such 

the greatest care should be exercised by the parents in the matter of 

surrounding the child with the environment least calculated to "draw 

out" the undesirable characteristic. The child has a right to be well 

born, and to be protected from being brought into the world subjected to 

the handicap of a "bad family history." If individuals cannot endow 

their children with a good family history, they should refrain from 

bearing children--such is the Eugenic advice on the subject. 

 

The same rule applies to the question of "acquired characteristics" of 

the parents--especially those acquired characteristics which are 

especially active at or just before the time of the contemplated 

conception. Though the family history of both husband and wife be ever 

so good, it is held that if one or both of the parents have acquired 

undesirable and transmissible characteristics, physical, mental, or 


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