Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

moral, then the question of bringing children into the world should be 

carefully considered, and conscientiously decided, after competent 

authorities have been consulted concerning the case. The prospective 

child should always be given the benefit of the doubt in such cases. To 

bring children into the world merely to gratify personal pleasure or 

pride, regardless of the welfare of the child, is something utterly 

unworthy of an intelligent and moral human being. 

 

 

Fitness for Parenthood. 

 

In determining the "fitness" for parenthood, on the part of husband and 

wife, the mental, physical, and moral qualities should all be taken 

into consideration. Weak or abnormal mentality; chronic immorality or 

perverted moral sense; or diseased or abnormal physical 

conditions--these should always be regarded as bars to parenthood. To 

violate this principle is to deliberately violate the fundamental laws 

of Nature, as well as those principles which are accepted as 

representing the best thought and customs of the race. A mental, moral, 

or physical "pervert" or "defective" is manifestly an "unfit," 

considered as a prospective parent. Parenthood on the part of such 

individuals is not only a crime against society, but always a base 

injustice perpetrated upon the offspring. 

 

A very interesting phase of the general subject now before us for 

consideration is that which touches upon the effect of those particular 

acquired characteristics which are especially active at the time, or 

just before the time of conception. The best authorities hold that the 

influences manifest and active in the prospective father and mother 

during the period immediately preceding conception will have a marked 

effect upon the character of the child. The following quotations from 

authorities on the subject will serve to illustrate this idea. 

 

Riddell says: "The transient physical, mental and moral conditions of 

the parents, prior to the initial of life, at the time of inception, do 

affect offspring." Dr. Cowan says: "Through the rightly directed wills 

of the mother and father, preceding and during ante-natal life, the 

child's form of body, character of mind, and purity of soul are formed 

and established. That in its plastic shape, during ante-natal life, like 

clay in the hand of the potter, it can be molded into absolutely any 

form of body and soul the parents may knowingly desire." Newton says: 

"Numerous facts indicate that offspring may be affected and their 

tendencies shaped by a great variety of influences, among which moods 


Page 5 from 6:  Back   1   2   3   4  [5]  6   Forward