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Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

Preparation for Parenthood. 

 

The ancient Greeks attached great importance to the mental, moral and 

physical condition of the parents at the moment of conception, and for a 

period preceding the same. The Investigations of modern scientists have 

tended to corroborate the facts upon which the ancient theories were 

based. Modern science teaches that the life-cells of each parent are 

impressed with the condition of the respective parents, and retain this 

impression until they meet and finally coalesce and combine, the 

combined cell then receiving the result of the original impressions. 

 

The best authorities on the subject claim that a reasonable time of 

self-restraint and continence should be observed by the prospective 

parents before the conception of the child. This contention is borne out 

by the experience of the breeders of fine horses and cattle, who have 

discovered that the best offspring are produced when the animals have 

been restrained from sexual intercourse for a reasonable time; this 

precaution being particularly observed in the case of the male parent 

animal. Writers on the subject cite a number of instances to prove that 

this law maintains in human as well is in animal life. It is claimed 

that Sir Isaac Newton was conceived after a period of over a year of 

total sexual abstinence on the part of his parents. Many other 

celebrated men are said to have been conceived after an absence from 

home on the part of the father, or a temporary absence from home on the 

part of the mother. Many physicians are able to cite many similar cases 

observed in the course of their own experience. 

 

The prospective parents should endeavor to bring themselves up to a high 

degree of physical health and well-being. The blood of the mother should 

be enriched by proper nutrition, and the organs of the body should be 

brought to a state of normal functioning along the lines of digestion, 

assimilation, and elimination. 

 

The minds of both parents should be exercised by reading the right kind 

of books, and by paying attention to natural objects of interest. A 

little change of scene will tend to awaken the powers of observation and 

attention. Riddell says: "If the prospective parents will habitually 

exercise the reasoning faculties and inventive powers, usually the 

offspring will have a fair degree of inventive talent and originality, 

even where these qualities are originally deficient in the parents. When 

there is a considerable natural talent or where there are latent 

inventive powers, constant training on the part of the parents will 

usually give the offspring exceptional powers in this direction." 


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