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Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

 

The prospective parents should also develop and exercise their moral 

faculties in the period preceding conception. This course will tend to 

reproduce the same quality in the child. The reverse of this, alas, is 

also true. A case is cited of a man who procreated a child while 

plotting a nefarious crime; and the child in after life manifested a 

tendency toward theft, roguery and rascality, even at a very early age. 

The lack of moral fibre so often noticed in the sons of rich men who 

have attained their success through questionable methods is perhaps as 

much attributable to these pre-conceptual influences as to the 

"spoiling" environment of the child after birth. 

 

In the period of physical, mental, and moral preparation for parenthood 

the leading thought of both parents should be: "DO WE WISH OUR CHILD TO 

BE LIKE THIS?" This thought, if carried as an ideal, will act both in 

the direction of self-restraint and self-development. 

 

The actual time of the conception of the new life should be carefully 

chosen, so that it may occur under the best circumstances and 

conditions. The suggestions embodied in the preceding paragraphs should 

have been carefully observed; and the time chosen should be one in which 

a peaceful and happy state of mind is possessed by both parents. The 

ovum of the woman is believed to have its greatest vitality about the 

time of the close of each menstrual period, and many good authorities 

hold that this is not only the natural period for sexual intercourse, 

but is also the exact period in which the life-forces in the ovum are 

strongest; and that, consequently, the child conceived at this period is 

likely to be stronger and more vigorous than the one conceived at a 

later time between the menstrual periods. 

 

Dr. Stall says: "Medical authorities attach great importance to the 

mental condition at the moment of conjunction and conception. It is 

quite universally believed that this is a moment of unparalleled 

importance to the welfare of the future being. It is an awful crime to 

beget life carelessly, and when in improper and unworthy mental states. 

Some people seem to think that the matter of begetting a child, like the 

matter of selecting a wife, should be left wholly to blind chance. 

Neither of these two important events can be too much safeguarded by 

wise and thoughtful consideration. If conception is permitted to take 

place when either one or both of the parents are in bad health; if the 

wife is an unwilling mother, and the embryo is developed by her while 


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