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Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

her whole nature rebels against the admission into the family of a child 

who is not wanted, the children begotten and born under such 

circumstances can never be other than sickly, nervous and fretful during 

their entire childhood, and cross and uncompanionable throughout their 

whole lives. 

 

"Much of the differences which exist between children of the same 

parents may be easily attributed to the different bodily and mental 

conditions of the parents at the period of conjunction, the changed 

physical, intellectual and emotional states of the parents at the 

different periods of conception producing the corresponding differences 

in their offspring. The results of purposed and prepared parenthood are 

so great and so desirable that a husband and wife should consider these 

matters carefully, making preparations, and approach the period when 

they would beget offspring and bring immortal beings into the world with 

the greatest thoughtfulness, consideration, and also with prayer." 

 

Dr. Hufeland says: "In my opinion, it is of the utmost importance that 

the moment of conception should be confined to a period when the 

sensation of collected powers, ardent passion, and a mind cheerful and 

free from care, invite to it on both sides." Riddell says: "The law of 

initial impressions is well established. It has been understood and 

applied by stock-raisers for centuries. Experiments prove that the 

qualities most highly excited in animals prior to their union are most 

fully transmitted. The speed of horses and the acquired characters of 

the dog have been improved by the applications of the law. History and 

classic literature contain many references that recognize its 

importance, like Shakespeare's 'Come on, ye cowards; ye were got in 

fear.' Ancient laws forbade union while parents were intoxicated, 

because such unions resulted in the production of drunkards and 

monstrosities. The asylums for the feeble-minded contain hundreds of 

unfortunate ones that are the product of such unions. The law of initial 

impressions, like the other laws of heredity, is traced most easily 

where morbid conditions are transmitted; but fortunately it is quite as 

potential in the production of desirable qualities. Unusual excitement 

to the social, intellectual or religious powers on the parents just 

prior to the inception of the new life frequently produce in the child 

corresponding tendencies." 

 

Dr. Stockham says: "Many a drunkard owes his lifelong appetite for 

alcohol to the fact that the inception of his life could be traced to a 

night of dissipation on the part of his father." Fleming says: "Not only 


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