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CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

Maternal Impressions. 

 

One of the oldest and most firmly-rooted beliefs of the race is that 

which holds that the pregnant mother may, and often does, consciously or 

unconsciously, impress upon her unborn child certain mental, moral, or 

physical traits. The majority of persons accept this idea as 

self-evident, and are able to cite cases within their own personal 

experience which go to prove the correctness of the popular belief. But 

certain modern authorities have sought to tear down this belief, and to 

discredit the general idea. Let us briefly consider both sides of this 

question. 

 

On the side of the generally accepted belief, Riddell says: "The more I 

study the influence of maternal impressions upon the life, mentality and 

character of men, the more I am led to believe that the education and 

moral training that a child receives before it sees the light of day are 

the most influential, and, therefore, the most important part of its 

education." Newton says: "A mother may, during the period of gestation, 

exercise some influence, by her own voluntary mental and physical 

action, either unwittingly or purposely, in determining the traits and 

tendencies of her offspring. This is now a common belief among 

intelligent people. Every observant teacher could doubtless bear witness 

to the same general facts, and it would be easy to fill a volume with 

testimonials from various sources illustrative and confirmatory of the 

law under discussion. Such facts establish beyond question the 

conviction that the mother has it largely in her power to confer on her 

child such a tendency of mind and conformation of brain as shall not 

only facilitate the acquisition of knowledge in any specific direction, 

but make it certain that such knowledge will be sought and acquired." 

 

Dr. Fordyce Baker says: "The weight of authority must be conceded to be 

in favor of the idea that maternal impressions may effect the growth, 

form and character of a forming child." Dr. Rokitansky says: "The 

question whether mental emotions do influence the development of the 

child must be answered 'Yes!'" Dr. Brittain says: "The singular effects 

produced on the unborn child by the sudden mental emotions of the mother 

are remarkable examples of a kind of electrotyping on the sensitive 

surface of living forms. It is doubtless true that the mind's action in 

such cases may increase or diminish the molecular deposits in the 

several portions of the system. The precise place which each separate 

particle assumes may be determined by the influence of thought or 

feeling. If, for example, there exists in the mother any unusual 


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