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CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

tendency of the vital forces to the brain at the critical period, there 

will be a similar cerebral development and activity in the offspring." 

 

Newton says: "The human embryo is formed and developed in all its parts, 

even to the minutest detail, by and through the action of the vital, 

mental, and spiritual forces of the mother, which forces act in and 

through the corresponding portions of her own organism. And while this 

process may go on unconsciously, or without the mother's voluntary 

participation or direction, yet she may consciously and purposely so 

direct her activities as, with a good degree of certainty, to accomplish 

specifically desired ends in determining the traits and qualities of her 

offspring." Professor Bayer says: "The influence of the mind of a 

prospective mother upon her child, before its birth, is of tremendous 

importance to its active existence as a member of society, from the fact 

that it lies in the mother's power to shape its mentality, that it may 

be a power for good or for evil." 

 

The views of that school of thought which is opposed to this old and 

generally accepted idea of material impressions, are ably presented by 

Dr. Saleeby, as follows: "Consider the case. The baby is at this time 

already a baby, though rather small and uncanny, floating in a fluid of 

its own manufacture. Its sole connection with the mother is by means of 

its umbilical cord--that is to say, blood-vessels, arterial and venous. 

There is no nervous connection whatever; absolutely nothing but the 

blood-stream, carried along a system of tubes. This blood is the child's 

blood, which it sends forth from itself along the umbillical cord to a 

special organ, the placenta or afterbirth, half made by itself and half 

made by the mother, in which the child's blood travels in thin vessels 

so close to the mother's blood that their contents can be interchanged. 

Yet the two streams never mix. The child's blood, having disposed of its 

carbonic acid and waste products to the mother's blood, and having 

received therefrom oxygen and food, returns so laden to the child. Pray 

how is the mother's reading of history to make the child a historian? We 

see now how the learning of geometry on the part of the mother before 

its birth will not set her baby upon that royal road to geometry of 

which Euclid rightly denied the existence--any more than after its 

birth. Such a thing does not happen--UNLESS WE ARE TO CALL IN 

TELEPATHY." 

 

All this argument may seem quite convincing--at first. But when we begin 


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