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CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

to consider the matter carefully, we begin to perceive the weak places 

in the argument as above presented. In the first place, it is known that 

emotions powerfully affect the condition, quality, and "life" of the 

blood. We know that cheerful emotions impart certain uplifting qualities 

to the blood, while depressing emotions correspondingly react upon it. 

Fear, worry, fright, jealousy, etc., are actual poisons to the blood, 

and have brought on diseased conditions to the persons manifesting these 

emotions. Moreover, it is known that impaired quality of the blood 

reacts upon the brain. Is it so unreasonable, then, to hold that 

emotional states in the mother may react upon the mental and physical 

condition of the unborn child, through the blood? Does not something 

similar occur in the case of the babe, after its birth, when it is 

affected by the conditions of its mother's milk brought on by her 

depressing emotions, fright, etc.? This would seem to explain at least 

the matter of emotional reactions between mother and unborn babe. 

 

But the case is not closed with the presentation of the evidence of 

physiology, important though that may be. There is an entirely different 

field of science to be drawn upon before the case is closed. The 

orthodox physiologist makes the mistake of supposing that all mental 

impulses and transmission of psychic energy require the service of 

nerves as channels of transmission. While such channels are usually 

required, we have good reasons for believing that there are exceptions 

to the rule. There have been found tiny creatures, possessing life and 

energy, performing the functions of nourishment, elimination, and even 

of reproduction--and yet without a nervous system. In one well-known 

instance, that of the moneron, we find not only an absence of a nervous 

system but also the lack of organs of any kind--and yet the creature 

lives, acts, moves, eats, thinks, and reproduces itself. 

 

Then, again, consider the moving cells of the blood, unconnected with 

the brain, unattached to the nervous system, and yet rushing to the work 

of repairing a wound, or of repelling an intruding germ, in obedience to 

a mental command from the controlling subconscious mental regions of the 

living creature. How does the mental impulse reach these cells and 

others of similar nature in the system? If we were not so sure of the 

facts, might we not feel inclined to say with Dr. Saleeby, in the above 

quoted sentence: "Such a thing does not happen--unless we are to call in 

telepathy." 

 

Moreover, examining Dr. Saleeby's statement, we see mention made of the 


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