Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

friends to owe his talent to the earnest thoughts and hopes of his 

mother during pregnancy--she is said to have pictured the child as a son 

destined to become a great moral philosopher, her mind being so firmly 

fixed on this fact that she felt it was already an assured fact. 

 

The Greeks were wont to surround the pregnant women with beautiful 

statuary, and it is recorded that in many cases the children afterward 

born closely resembled these works of art and beauty. It is claimed that 

many Italian women closely resemble the face shown in Raphael's 

"Madonna," copies of this celebrated picture being quite common in 

Italian households. Frances Willard, the temperance worker, is said to 

have very closely resembled a young woman of whom her mother was very 

fond. Many family resemblances are believed to have arisen in this way, 

rather than by heredity. Zerah Colburn, the mathematical prodigy whose 

feats astounded the scientific world in the early part of the last 

century, is said to have derived his wonderful faculty from maternal 

impressions of this kind; his mother is said to have occupied much of 

her time during her pregnancy in studying arithmetic and working 

problems, the study being quite new to her and proving very interesting. 

 

Cases similar to those above quoted might be duplicated almost 

indefinitely. The story is practically the same in each and every case. 

The principle involved is always that the pregnant mother took a decided 

interest in certain subjects, studies, and work, and that the child when 

born manifested at an early age similar tastes and inclinations. But far 

more important to the average prospective parent is the fact that many 

authorities positively claim that ANY PREGNANT MOTHER MAY CONSCIOUSLY 

AND DELIBERATELY INFLUENCE AND SHAPE THE CHARACTER, PHYSICAL, MENTAL, 

AND MORAL OF HER UNBORN CHILD. 

 

Newton well says, on this subject: "In the cases usually given to the 

public bearing on this topic, the moulding power appears to have been 

exercised merely by accident or chance; that is, without any intelligent 

purpose on the part of mothers to produce the results. Can there be any 

doubt that similar means, if purposely and wisely adopted, and applied 

with the greater care and precision which enlightened intention secure, 

would produce under the same law even more perfect results. Is it not 

altogether probable that an intentional direction of the vital or mental 

forces to any particular portion of the brain will cause a development 

and activity in the corresponding portion of the brain of the offspring? 


Page 6 from 7:  Back   1   2   3   4   5  [6]  7   Forward