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Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

There seems to be no reasonable ground on which these propositions can 

be denied. The brain is made up of a congeries of organs which are the 

organs of distinct faculties of the mind or soul. It follows, then, that 

if the mother during gestation maintains a special activity of any one 

brain organ, or group of organs, in her brain, she thereby causes more 

development of the corresponding organ or group in the brain of the 

fetus. She thus determines a tendency in the child to special activity 

of the faculties, of which such organs are the instruments. It is plain, 

furthermore, that if any one organ or faculty may thus be cultivated 

before birth, and its activity enhanced for life, so may any other--and 

so may all. It would seem, then, clearly within the bounds of 

possibility that a mother, by pursuing a systematic and comprehensive 

method, may give a well-rounded and harmoniously developed organism to 

her child--notwithstanding her own defects, which, under the unguided 

operation of hereditary law, are likely to be repeated in her offspring. 

Or it is within her power to impart a leading tendency in any specific 

direction that she may deem desirable, for a life of the highest 

usefulness. IN THIS WAY ANCESTRAL DEFECTS AND UNDESIRABLE HEREDITARY 

TRAITS, OF WHATEVER NATURE OR HOWEVER STRONG, MAY BE OVERCOME, OR IN A 

GOOD DEGREE COUNTERBALANCED BY GIVING GREATER ACTIVITY TO COUNTERACTING 

TENDENCIES; and, in this way, too, it would appear the coveted gifts of 

genius may be conferred. In other words, it would seem to be within the 

mother's power, by the voluntary and intelligent direction of her own 

forces, in orderly and systematic methods, both to mold the physical 

form to lines of beauty, and shape the mental, moral, and spiritual 

features of her child to an extent to which no limit can be assigned." 

 

I think that in the pages of this particular part of the book the 

prospective parent may find hints and general directions toward a 

clearly defined ideal, which is carefully studied, and as carefully put 

into practice will produce results far beyond the dreams of the average 

man and woman. The hope is a magnificent one, and the best testimony is 

in favor of the possibility of its actual realization. 


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