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CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

LESSON VIII 

 

EUGENICS AND CHARACTER 

 

 

The rapidly growing interest in Eugenics, and the scientific 

consideration of the world-wide decline in the birth-rate have drawn 

attention to the study of the eugenic factors which determine the 

production of high ability in offspring. Many distinguished 

investigators have conducted long and exhaustive investigations for the 

purpose of ascertaining and summarizing all possible biological data 

concerning the parentage and birth of the most notable persons born in 

European countries, and to a lesser extent in America. 

 

The investigations are now acquiring a fresh importance, because, while 

it is becoming recognized that we are gaining a control over the 

conditions of birth, the production of children has itself gained an 

importance. The world is no longer to be bombarded by an exuberant 

stream of babies, good, bad, and indifferent in quality, with mankind to 

look on calmly at the struggle for existence among them. Whether we like 

it or not, the quantity is steadily diminishing, and the question of 

quality is beginning to assume a supreme significance. The question then 

is being anxiously asked: "What are the conditions which assure the 

finest quality in our children?" 

 

A German scientist, Dr. Vaerting, of Berlin, published just before the 

War a treatise on the subject of the most favorable age in parents for 

the production of offspring of ability. He treated the question in an 

entirely new spirit, not merely as a matter of academic discussion, but 

rather as a practical matter of vital importance to the welfare of 

modern society. He starts by asserting that "our century has been called 

the century of the child," and that for the child all manner of rights 

are now being claimed. But, he wisely adds, there is seldom considered 

the prime right of all the child's rights, i. e., the right of the child 

to the best ability and capacity for efficiency that his parents are 

able to transmit to him. The good doctor adds that this right is the 

root of all children's rights; and that when the mysteries of 

procreation have been so far revealed as to enable this right to be won, 

we shall, at the same time renew the spiritual aspect of the nations. 

 

The writer referred to decided that the most easily ascertainable and 

measurable factor in the production of ability, and efficiency in 

offspring, and a factor of the greatest significance, is the age of the 

parents at the child's birth. He investigated a number of cases of men 

of ability and efficiency, along these lines, and made a careful summary 


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