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Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

of his results. Some of his results are somewhat startling, and may 

possibly require the corroboration of other investigators before they 

can be accepted as authoritative; but they are worthy of being carefully 

considered at the present time, pending such further investigation. 

 

Vaerting found that the fathers who were themselves not notably 

intellectual have a decidedly more prolonged power of procreating 

distinguished children than is possessed by distinguished fathers. The 

former may become the fathers of eminent children from the period of 

sexual maturity up to the age of forty-three or beyond. When, however, 

the father is himself of high intellectual distinction, the records show 

that he was nearly always under thirty, and usually under twenty-five 

years of age at the time of the birth of his distinguished son, although 

the proportion of youthful fathers in the general population is 

relatively small. The eleven youngest fathers on Vaerting's list, from 

twenty-one to twenty-five years of age, were with one exception 

themselves more or less distinguished; while the fifteen oldest, from 

thirty-nine to sixty years of age, were all without exception 

undistinguished. 

 

Among the sons on the latter list are to be found much greater names 

(such as Goethe, Bach, Kant, Bismarck, Wagner, etc.) than are to be 

found among the sons of young and more distinguished fathers, for here 

is only one name (Frederick the Great) of the same caliber. The elderly 

fathers belonged to the large cities, and were mostly married to wives 

very much younger than themselves. Vaerting notes that the most eminent 

men have frequently been the sons of fathers who were not engaged in 

intellectual avocations at all, but earned their living as humble 

craftsmen. He draws the conclusion from these data that strenuous 

intellectual energy is much more unfavorable than hard physical labor to 

the production of marked ability in the offspring. Intellectual workers, 

therefore, he argues, must have their children when young, and we must 

so modify our social ideals and economic conditions as to render this 

possible. 

 

Vaerting, however, holds that the mother need not be equally young; he 

finds some superiority, indeed, provided the father is young, in 

somewhat elderly mothers, and there were no mothers under twenty-three 

on the list. The rarity of genius among the offspring of distinguished 

parents he attributes to the unfortunate tendency to marry too late; and 

he finds that the distinguished men who marry late rarely have any 

children at all. Speaking generally, and apart from the production of 


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