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Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

genius, he holds that women have children too early, before their 

psychic development is completed, while men have children too late, when 

they have already "in the years of their highest psychic generative 

fitness planted their most precious seed in the mud of the street." 

 

The eldest child was found to have by far the best chance of turning 

out distinguished, and in this fact Vaerting finds further proof of his 

argument. The third son has the next best chance, and then the second, 

the comparatively bad position of the second being attributed to the too 

brief interval which often follows the birth of the first child. He also 

notes that of all the professions the clergy come beyond comparison 

first as the parents of distinguished sons (who are, however, rarely of 

the highest degree of eminence), lawyers following, while officers in 

the army and physicians scarcely figure at all. Vaerting is inclined to 

see in this order, especially in the predominance of the clergy, the 

favorable influence of an unexhausted reserve of energy and a habit of 

chastity on intellectual procreativeness. 

 

It should be remembered, however, that Vaerting's cases on his list were 

all those of Germans, and, therefore, the influence of the 

characteristic social customs and conditions of the German people must 

be taken into account in the consideration. 

 

Havelock Ellis in his well known work "Study of British Genius" dealt on 

a still larger scale, and with a somewhat more precise method, with many 

of the same questions as illustrated by British cases. After the 

publication of Vaerting's work, Ellis re-examined his cases, and 

rearranged his data. His results, like those of the German authority, 

showed a special tendency for genius to appear in the eldest child, 

though there was no indication of notably early marriage in the parents. 

He also found a similar predominance of the clergy among the fathers, 

and a similar deficiency of army officers and physicians. 

 

Ellis found that the most frequent age of the father was thirty-two 

years, but that the average age of the father at the distinguished 

child's birth was 36.6 years; and that when the fathers were themselves 

distinguished their age was not, as Vaerting found in Germany, notably 

low at the birth of their distinguished sons, but higher than the 

general average, being 37.5 years. He found fifteen distinguished sons 

of distinguished British fathers, but instead of being nearly always 

under thirty and usually under twenty-five, as Vaerting found it in 


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