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Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

Germany, the British distinguished father has only five times been under 

thirty, and among these only twice under twenty-five. Moreover, 

precisely the most distinguished of the sons (Francis Bacon and William 

Pitt) had the oldest fathers, and the least distinguished sons the 

youngest fathers. 

 

Ellis says of his general conclusions resulting from this investigation: 

"I made some attempts to ascertain whether different kinds of genius 

tend to be produced by fathers who were at different periods of life. I 

refrained from publishing the results as I doubted whether the numbers 

dealt with were sufficiently large to carry any weight. It may, however, 

be worth while to record them, as possibly they are significant. I made 

four classes of men of genius: (1) Men of Religion, (2) Poets, (3) 

Practical Men, (4) Scientific Men and Sceptics. (It must not, of course, 

be supposed that in this last group all the scientific men were 

sceptics, or all the sceptics scientific.) The average age of the 

fathers at the distinguished son's birth was, in the first group, 35 

years; in the second and third group, 37 years; and in the last group, 

40 years. (It may be noted, however, that the youngest father of all the 

history of British genius, aged sixteen, produced Napier, who introduced 

logarithms.) 

 

"It is difficult not to believe that as regards, at all events, the two 

most discrepant groups, the first and last, we come upon a significant 

indication. It is not unreasonable to suppose that in the production of 

men of religion in whose activity emotion is so potent a factor, the 

youthful age of the father should prove favorable; while for the 

production of genius of a more coldly intellectual and analytic type 

more elderly fathers are demanded. If that should prove to be so, it 

would become a source of happiness to religious parents to have their 

children early, while irreligious parents should be advised to delay 

parentage. 

 

"It is scarcely necessary to remark that the age of the mothers is 

probably quite as influential as that of the fathers. Concerning the 

mothers, however, we always have less precise information. My records, 

so far as they go, agree with Vaerting's for German genius, in 

indicating that an elderly mother is more likely to produce a child of 

genius than a very youthful mother. There were only fifteen mothers 

recorded under twenty-five years of age, while thirteen were over 

thirty-nine years; the most important age for mothers was twenty-seven. 

 

"On all these points we certainly need controlling evidence from other 

countries. Thus, before we insist with Vaerting that an elderly mother 


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