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Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

is a factor in the production of genius, we may recall that even in 

Germany the mothers of Goethe and Nietzsche were both eighteen at their 

distinguished son's birth. A rule which permits of such tremendous 

exceptions scarcely seems to bear the strain of emphasis." 

 

The student, however, must always remember that while the study of 

genius and exceptionable talent is highly interesting, and even, as is 

quite probable, not without significance for the general laws of 

heredity, still we must beware of too hastily drawing conclusions from 

it to bear on the practical questions of eugenics. Genius is rare--and, 

in a certain sense, abnormal. Laws meant for application to the general 

population must be based on a study of the general population. Vaerting, 

himself, realized how inadequate it was to confine our study to cases of 

genius. 

 

Another investigator, Marro, an Italian scientist, in his well-known 

book on puberty which was published several years ago, brought forth 

some interesting data showing the result of the age of the parents on 

the moral and intellectual characters of school-children in Northern 

Italy. He found that children with fathers below twenty-six at their 

birth showed the maximum of bad conduct and the minimum of good; they 

also yielded the greatest proportion of children of irregular, 

troublesome, or lazy character, but not of really perverse children--the 

latter being equally distributed among fathers of all ages. The largest 

number of cheerful children belonged to the young fathers, while the 

children tended to become more melancholy with ascending age of the 

fathers. Young fathers produced the largest number of intelligent, as 

well as of troublesome children; but when the very exceptional 

intelligent children were considered separately, they were found to be 

more usually the offspring of elderly fathers. 

 

As regarded the mothers, Marro found that the children of young mothers 

(under twenty-one) are superior, both as regards conduct and 

intelligence, though the more exceptionally intelligent children tended 

to belong to more mature mothers. When the parents were both in the same 

age-groups, the immature and the elderly groups tended to produce more 

children who were unsatisfactory, both as regards conduct and 

intelligence--the intermediate group yielding the most satisfactory 

results of this kind. 

 

Havelock Ellis makes the following plea for further investigations along 

these lines, in the interest of the well-being of the race: "But we have 


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