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Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

need of inquiries made on a more wholesale and systematic scale. They 

are no longer of a merely speculative character. We no longer regard 

children as the 'gifts of God' flung into our helpless hands; we are 

beginning to realize that the responsibility is ours to see that they 

come into the world under the best conditions, and at the moments when 

their parents are best fitted to produce them. Vaerting proposes that it 

should be the business of all school authorities to register the ages of 

the pupils' parents. This is scarcely a provision to which even the most 

susceptible parent could reasonably object, though there is no cause to 

make the declaration compulsory where a 'conscientious' objection 

existed, and in any case the declaration would not be public. 

 

"It would be an advantage--although this might be more difficult to 

obtain--to have the date of the children's marriage, and of the birth of 

previous children, as well as some record of the father's standing in 

his occupation. But even the ages of the parents alone would teach us 

much when correlated with the school position of the pupil in 

intelligence and conduct. It is quite true that there are unavoidable 

fallacies. We are not, as in the case of genius, dealing with people 

whose life-work is complete and open to the whole world's examination. 

 

"The good and clever child is not necessarily the forerunner of the 

first-class man or woman; and many capable and successful men have been 

careless in attendance at lectures, and rebellious to discipline. 

Moreover, the prejudice and limitations of the teachers have to be 

recognized. Yet when we are dealing with millions most of these 

fallacies would be smoothed out. We should be, once for all, in a 

position to determine authoritatively the exact bearing of one of the 

simplest and most vital factors of the betterment of the race. We should 

be in possession of a new clue to guide us in the creation of the man in 

the coming world. Why not begin today?" 

 

Considerable attention on the part of the American thinking public has 

been directed toward the investigations and researches of Casper L. 

Redfield. Mr. Redfield combats the orthodox scientific position that the 

acquired qualities are not transmitted to offspring; and he most 

positively states that such characteristics are transmitted to 

offspring, and are really the causes which have tended toward the 

evolution and progress of the race. But he insists upon this vital 

point, namely, that the parent must already have acquired improved 

quality before he can transmit improvement to the offspring--and that 


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