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Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

developed hunting dogs. To each case he applies his question: "Where and 

how did those generations of animals get that power which they 

transmitted but did not inherit?" In his investigations he claims to 

have discovered the secret, namely, that the ancestors, throughout 

several generations, had each acquired the power which it transmitted, 

which added to the inherited power raised the general power of the 

stock. This arose from careful breeding, and directly from the fact that 

the average age of the parent was much higher in the highly-bred stock 

than in the "scrub" or ordinary run of stock. In other words, DELAYED 

PARENTAGE PRODUCED BETTER OFFSPRING. 

 

Mr. Redfield proceeds to argue from these facts as follows: "At one 

time man and ape reproduced at the same average age, whereas now they 

reproduce at widely different ages. Going back to the time when man and 

ape separated, our ancestors survived by physical and mental activity in 

securing food and escaping from enemies. As time went on man reproduced 

at later and later average age until now he reproduces at about thirty 

years from birth of parent to birth of offspring. When time between 

generations stretched out in the man line more than it did in the ape 

line, the man acquired MORE MENTAL DEVELOPMENT BEFORE HE REPRODUCED than 

did the ape, and he did this because he was mentally active more years 

before reproducing. The successive generations leading to modern man 

transmitted to offspring more than they inherited from their parents, 

and the generations which did this are the same generations which 

acquired, before reproducing, the identical thing which they transmitted 

in excess of inheriting. 

 

"Coming now to those rare men of whom we have only a few in a century, 

how were they produced? It should be noted that each one had two 

parents, four grandparents, and eight great-grandparents. Also that they 

are certainly improvements over their great-grandparents. If they were 

not such improvements, then there would be many 'rare' cases in a 

century. In looking into the pedigrees of these great men it is found 

that they were sons of parents of nearly all ages, but were 

predominantly sons of elderly parents. While we sometimes find 

comparatively young parents in the pedigree of a great man, we never 

find a succession of young parents. Neither do we find an intellectually 

great man produced by a pedigree extending over three generations. The 

great man is produced only when the average for three generations is on 

the elderly side of what is normal. The average age of one thousand 


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