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Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

fathers, grandfathers, and great-grandfathers in the pedigrees of 

eminent men was found to be over forty years. Great men rise from 

ordinary stock only when several generations in succession acquire 

mental efforts in excess amounts before reproducing." 

 

It is the opinion of the present writer that the theories of Mr. 

Redfield are in the main true, and that in the future much valuable 

information will be obtained along the same lines, which will tend to 

corroborate his general conclusions. One's attention needs but to be 

plainly directed to the matter, and then he will see that it is absurd 

to think of a creature transmitting to his offspring qualities which 

neither he or his mate had inherited or acquired. If there were no 

transmission of acquired qualities there would be no improvement--and in 

fact, we know that the bulk of inherited qualities were at some time in 

the history of the race "acquired." And, reasoning along the same line, 

we may see that the young parents who have not had as yet an opportunity 

to acquire mental power cannot expect to transmit it to their 

offspring--all that they can do is to transmit the inherited stock 

qualities plus the small acquired power which they have gained in their 

limited experience. And, finally, it is seen that offspring produced at 

a riper age of parenthood, continued over several generations, tend 

toward unusual ability and powers. Consequently, the people or nation 

with a higher average age of parenthood may logically expect to attain 

greater mental powers than the peoples lacking that quality. And what is 

true of a people or nation is of course true of a particular family. 

 

The subject touched upon in this part of our book is one of the greatest 

interest to careful students of Eugenics; and is one which calls for 

careful and unprejudiced consideration from all persons having the 

interest of the race at heart. 

 


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