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Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

their investigations; they find that certain conditions affect the 

sex-ratio of cells, and they explain the result by assuming that UNDER 

SOME CIRCUMSTANCES MALE-DETERMINING OVA ARE PRODUCED IN EXCESS, AND 

UNDER OTHER CIRCUMSTANCES, FEMALE-DETERMINING." 

 

Professor Rumley Dawson holds to the opinion that the male-determining 

and female-determining ova are discharged alternately from the ovaries. 

In woman one ovum is usually discharged each month, and it is maintained 

that on one month the ovum is male-determining, and in the next, 

female-determining. It is obvious that exceptions must occur, for boy 

and girl twins are quite common, but if the cases which support the 

hypothesis are taken by themselves, and the exceptions explained away, 

it is possible to make out a strong case in favor of this theory. Some 

authorities hold that the right ovary produces male-determining ova, and 

the left ovary female-determining, and that the two ovaries discharge an 

ovum alternately, but an impartial examination of the evidence for this 

belief shows that it rests on very slender foundations. Experiments on 

the lower animals have shown that after the complete removal of one 

ovary the female may produce young of both sexes. Women, also, have 

produced children of a particular sex after the corresponding ovary has 

been removed, and it is hardly possible to believe that the removal in 

all these cases was incomplete. On the whole it must be concluded that 

the theory is insufficiently supported by the evidence. 

 

Another widely promulgated and vigorously supported theory is that which 

holds that the sex of the future child may be determined by specific 

nutrition of the mother before conception, and in some cases after 

conception. Schenk's theory, advanced about 1900, attracted much 

attention at the time. He based his method on the observation that a 

number of women whose children were all girls all excreted sugar in 

their urine, such as happens in the case of persons affected with 

diabetes. From this he suspected that the physiological condition which 

leads to the excretion of sugar was inimical to the development of 

male-determining ova, and that males could be produced by its 

prevention. He therefore recommended that those who desire a male child 

should undergo treatment similar to that prescribed for diabetes for two 

or three months before conception, and held that a boy would be produced 

by these methods. Although this method has had considerable vogue, it 

cannot be held to have been established on a scientific basis. 


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