Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

 

Doncaster says "The general conclusion with regard to man must therefore 

be that if sex is determined solely by the spermatozoon there is no hope 

either of influencing or predicting it in special cases. On the other 

hand, there is considerable evidence that the ovum has some share in the 

effect, and if this is so, before any practical results are reached it 

will be necessary to discover which of two conceivable causes of 

sex-determination is the true one. It is possible that there are two 

kinds of ova, as well as two kinds of spermatozoa, and that there is a 

selective fertilization of such a kind that one kind of spermatozoon 

only fertilizes one kind of ovum, the second kind of spermatozoon the 

second kind of ovum. If this should prove to be the case, it is possible 

that means might be found of influencing or predicting that kind of ovum 

which is discharged under any set of conditions. Secondly, it is 

possible that the ova are potentially all alike, but that their 

physiological condition may under some circumstances be so altered that 

the sex is determined independently of the spermatozoon. * * * It is 

hardly possible to avoid the conclusion that the sex of the offspring 

may be influenced, at least under certain circumstances, by the mother. 

The search for means of influencing the sex of the offspring through the 

mother is not of necessity doomed to failure. No results of a really 

positive kind have been obtained hitherto, and some of the facts point 

so clearly to sex-determination by the male germ-cell alone in man and 

other animals that many investigators have concluded that the quest is 

hopeless; but until an adequate explanation has been given of certain 

phenomena discovered in the investigation of the subject, it seems more 

reasonable to maintain an open mind, and to regard the control of sex in 

man as an achievement not entirely impossible of realization." 

 

Another writer on the subject has said: "Every individual among the 

higher animals, whether male or female, begins as an impregnated ovum in 

the mother's body. Any such ovum contains elements of constitution from 

both of its parents. In the earliest existence of this impregnated ovum, 

there is a season of sexual indifference, or indecision, in which the 

embryo is both male and female, having the characteristic rudiments of 

each sex, only indifferently manifested. In this stage, the embryo is 

susceptible of being influenced by external conditions to develop more 

strongly in the one or the other direction and thus become distinctly 

and permanently male or female. It is evident that this is the season in 


Page 4 from 9:  Back   1   2   3  [4]  5   6   7   8   9   Forward