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Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

the development of the individual in which influencing conditions and 

causes must operate in deciding its sex, although it is possible in some 

of the lower animals to alter the tendency of sex in the embryo from one 

sex to the other, even after it has been quite definitely determined. It 

is well established, in fact, that differences do not come from a 

difference in the ova themselves; that is, there is not one kind of ova 

from the female which becomes female, while other ova become male, for 

it is possible to alter the tendency toward the one sex or the other 

after the ovum has been fertilized and the embryo has begun its career 

of development. This possible change in sex tendency in the embryo also 

proves that sex is not decided by a difference in the spermatozoa; that 

is some of the sperm cells from the father are not male, while others 

are female, in their constitution. 

 

"It is incorrect to suppose, as has been held by some theorists, that 

one testicle give rise to male spermatozoa and the other to female 

spermatozoa, for both male and female offspring have been produced from 

the same male parent after one testicle or the other has been removed. 

The same is true in cases in which either ovary has been removed from 

the mother; that is, male and female offspring are produced from mothers 

in whom either ovary has been removed. In like manner, the sex of 

offspring is shown not to be materially affected by the comparative 

vigor of the parents; thus, a stronger father than mother does not 

necessarily produce one sex to the exclusion of the other. These 

negative decisions are important because they simplify the solution of 

the problem of sex-determination, by excluding, more or less fully, 

various causes which have been supposed to operate quite forcibly in 

deciding the sex of offspring. Some of the more positive agencies that 

enter into the determination of sex are found (1) in the influence of 

nutrition upon the embryo during its indifferent stage of sexual 

development, and (2) in the constitution and general condition of the 

mother before and during the early stages of pregnancy. These two 

factors appear to enter more fully than any others in the decision of 

the sex in offspring, and deserve the greatest consideration. The 

influence of food in supplying the embryo with nourishment for its 

development is, perhaps, the most potent of these determining causes." 

 

Investigators along the line of theory indicated in the above last 

quotation, i. e., the theory of sex determination by means of 


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