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CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

go toward establishing the fact that abundant nourishment of the embryo, 

during the neutral stage, tends to produce femaleness in it. They also 

claim that caterpillars which are very poorly nourished before entering 

into the chrysalis stage usually develop into male butterflies, while 

those highly nourished in the said stage tend to become females. 

Experiments on sheep have shown that when the ewes are particularly well 

nourished the offspring will show a large proportion of females. 

 

A writer, favoring the theory in question, says: "In general, it is 

reasonable to infer that the higher sexual organization which 

constitutes the female is to be attained in the greatest number of cases 

by embryos which have superior vital conditions during the formative 

period. Among human beings, some facts of general observation become 

significant in the light of the foregoing inferences. After epidemics, 

after wars, after seasons of privation and distress, the tendency is 

toward a majority of male births. On the other hand, abundant crops, low 

prices, peace, contentment and prosperity tend to increase the number of 

females born. Mothers in prosperous families usually have more girls; 

mothers in families of distress have more boys. Large, well-fed, fully 

developed, healthy women, who are of contented and passive disposition, 

generally become mothers of families abounding in girls; while mothers 

who are small or spare of flesh, who are poorly fed, restless, unhappy, 

overworked, exhausted by frequent childbearing, or who are reduced by 

other causes which waste their vital energies, usually give birth to a 

greater number of boys. As a general proposition, the facts and 

inferences tend to establish the truth of the doctrine with women, that, 

the more favorable the vital conditions of the mother during the period 

in which the sex of her offspring is being determined, the greater the 

ratio of females she will bear; the less favorable her vital conditions 

at such times, the greater will be her tendency to bear males. That many 

apparent exceptions occur does not disprove the general tendency here 

maintained. Moreover, it is impossible to know in all cases what were 

the conditions of the mother's organism at the time in which her child 

was in its delicate balance between predominant femaleness and maleness; 

else many cases which seemingly disprove the proposition would be found 

to be forcible illustrations of its truth. Still further, it is probable 

that other causes besides those here mentioned act with greater or less 

effect in determining the sex of offspring." 


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