Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

such consideration is advisable, as in the case of any and all important 

problems presenting themselves for solution and judgment, it is found 

that those so considering the subject have a sound and firm foundation 

upon which to base their thought and to test their conclusions. 

 

As many thoughtful students of the subject have pointed out to us, the 

question of Birth Control has been with the race practically since the 

beginning of human history; and it has its correspondences in the 

instinctive actions of the lower forms of life. The chief difference is 

that we are now seeking to deal with these problems consciously, 

voluntarily, and deliberately, whereas in the past the race has dealt 

with them more or less unconsciously, by methods of trial and error, 

through perpetual experiment which has often proved costly but which has 

all the more clearly brought out the real course of natural processes. 

 

We cannot hope to solve problems so ancient and so deeply rooted as 

these by merely the rational methods of yesterday and today. To be of 

value our rational methods must be the revelation in deliberate 

consciousness of unconscious methods which go far back into the remote 

past. Our deliberate methods will not be sound except in so far as they 

are a continuation of those methods which, in the slow evolution of 

life, have been found sound and progressive on the plane of instinct. 

This is particularly true in the case of those among us who desire their 

own line of conduct in the matter to be so closely in accord with 

natural law, or the law of creation, that to question it would be 

impious. 

 

It may be accepted without an extended argument or presentation of 

evidence that at the outset the prime object of Nature seems to have 

been that of Reproduction. There is evident, without doubt, an effort on 

the part of Nature to secure economy of method in the attainment of ever 

greater perfection in the process of reproduction, but we cannot deny 

that the primary motive seems to be that of reproduction pure and 

simple. The tendency toward reproduction is indeed so fundamental in 

Nature that it is impressed with the greatest emphasis upon every living 

thing. And, as careful thinkers have told us "the course of evolution 

seems to have been more of an effort to slow down reproduction than to 

furnish it with new facilities." 

 

Reproduction appears in the history of life even before sex manifests 

itself. The lower forms of animal and plant life oftener produce 

themselves without the aid of sex, and some authorities have argued that 


Page 5 from 7:  Back   1   2   3   4  [5]  6   7   Forward