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CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

the presence of sex differentiation serves rather to check active 

propagation rather than to increase it. If quantity, without regard to 

quality or variation, be the object of Nature, then that purpose would 

have been better served by withholding sex-differentiation than by 

evolving it. As Professor Coulter, a leading American botanist, has well 

said: "The impression one gains of sexuality is that it represents 

reproduction under peculiar difficulties." 

 

To those who find it difficult to assimilate this somewhat startling 

idea, we now present a brief statement of the infinitely greater 

facility toward reproduction manifested by living creatures lacking in 

sex-differentiation as compared with those possessing it. It is seen that 

bacteria among primitive plants, and protozoa among primitive animals, 

are patterns of very rapid and prolific reproduction, though sex begins 

to appear in a rudimentary form in very lowly forms of life. A single 

infusorian becomes in a week the ancestor of millions, that is to say, 

of far more individuals than could proceed under the most favorable 

conditions from a pair of elephants in five centuries; and Huxley has 

calculated that the progeny of a single parthenogenetic aphis, under 

favorable circumstances, would in a few months outweigh the whole 

population of China. It must be noted, however, that this proviso "under 

favorable circumstances" reveals the weak point of Nature's early method 

of reproduction by enormously rapid multiplication. Creatures so easily 

produced are easily destroyed; and Nature, apparently in consequence, 

wastes no time in imparting to them the qualities needed for a high form 

of life and living. 

 

And, even after sex differentiation had attained a considerable degree of 

development, Nature seemed slow to abandon her original plan of rapid 

multiplication of individuals. Among insects so far advanced as the 

white ants, the queen lays eggs at the enormous rate of 80,000 a day 

during her period of active life. Higher in the scale, we find the 

female herring laying 70,000 eggs at one period of delivery. But in both 

of these cases we find the manifestation of that apparently invariable 

rule of Nature, viz., that A HIGH BIRTH-RATE IS ACCOMPANIED BY A HEAVY 

DEATH-RATE, whether that high death-rate be caused by natural enemies, 

wars, or disease. 

 

At a certain stage of the evolutionary process, Nature seems to have 

awakened to a realization of the fact that it was better, from every 

point of view, to produce A FEW superior beings rather than a vast 

number of inferior ones. Here, at last, Nature discloses a heretofore 


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