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CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

 

A writer has said along these lines: "As reproduction slackened, 

evolution was greatly accelerated. A highly important and essential 

aspect of this greater individuation is a higher survival value. The 

more complex and better equipped creature can meet and subdue 

difficulties and dangers to which the more lowly organized creature that 

came before--produced wholesale in a way which Nature seems to look 

back on as cheap and nasty--succumbed helplessly without an effort. The 

idea of economy began to assert itself in the world. It became clear in 

the course of evolution that it is better to produce really good and 

highly efficient organisms, at whatever cost, than to be content with 

cheap production on a wholesale scale. They allowed greater 

developmental progress to be made, and they lasted better. Even before 

man began it was proved in the animal world that THE DEATH-RATE FALLS AS 

THE BIRTH-RATE FALLS." 

 

Let us compare the lowly herring with the highly evolved elephant. The 

herring multiplies with enormous rapidity and on a vast scale, and it 

possesses a very small brain, and is almost totally unequipped to 

grapple with the special difficulties of its life, to which it succumbs 

on a wholesale scale. A single elephant is carried for about two years 

in its mother's womb, and is carefully guarded by her for many years 

after birth; it possesses a large brain, and its muscular system is as 

remarkable for its delicacy as for its power, and is guided by the most 

sensitive perceptions. It is fully equipped for all the dangers of life, 

save for those which have been introduced by the subtle ingenuity of 

modern man. Though a single pair of elephants produces so few offspring, 

yet their high cost is justified, for each of them has a reasonable 

chance of surviving to old age. This contrast, from the point of view of 

reproduction, of the herring and the elephant, well illustrates the 

principle of evolution previously referred to. It brings clearly into 

view the difference between Nature's earlier and her later methods--the 

ever increasing preference for quality over quantity. Unless we grasp 

this underlying principle of Nature in its wider aspects we may fail to 

perceive its operations in the case of man, which latter we may now 

consider. 

 

It is, of course, impossible to speak positively regarding the 

birth-rate and death-rate of the pre-historic primitive races of 

mankind, for there is not data upon which to base such a report. But 

reasoning upon the basis of conditions existing among the primitive 

tribes of the present time we are justified in holding that in the early 


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