Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

children was particularly heavy. Writers have pointed out that the old 

family records show frequently two or three children of the same 

Christian name, the first child having died and its name given to a 

successor. 

 

During the last quarter of the eighteenth century, when machinery was 

introduced and a new industrial era opened, the birth-rate rose rapidly. 

Factories springing up gave increased support to many, and as children 

were employed as "hands" in the mills at an early age, the richest 

family was the one with most children. The population began to increase 

rapidly. But soon disease, misery, and poverty arose from filth and 

insanitation, immorality and crime, overcrowding and child-labor, drink 

and lack of sane courses of conduct. 

 

In time, however, progress set in, and social reformers began the great 

movement for the betterment of the environment, sanitation, shorter 

hours of labor, and restriction of child-labor, factory regulation, etc. 

And when the environment is bettered, the death-rate drops, and the 

birth-rate accompanies it on its downward progress. As Leroy-Beaulieu 

says: "The first degree of prosperity in a rude population with few 

needs tends toward prolificness of reproduction; a later degree of 

prosperity, accompanied by all the feelings and ideas stimulated by the 

reduction of such prolificness." 

 

The law of the reduction of reproduction in response to the improvement 

of environment is a natural law, arising from fixed biological 

principles. This is because when we improve the environment we improve 

the individual situated in that environment; and the improvement of the 

individual has always resulted in a check upon reproduction. We must 

remember, however, that this change is not the result of conscious or 

voluntary action; instead it is the result of unconscious activities and 

instinctive urge. As Sir Shirley Murphy has said: "Birth Control is a 

natural process, and though in civilized men, endowed with high 

intelligence, it necessarily works in some measure voluntarily and 

deliberately, it is probable that it also works, as in the evolution of 

the lower animals, to some extent automatically." 

 

Science shows us that even among the most primitive micro-organisms; 

when placed under unfavorable conditions as to food and environment, 

they tend to pass into a reproductive phase and by sporulation or 

otherwise begin to produce new individuals rapidly. This, of course, 

because of the fact that their death-rate is increased, and an increased 

birth-rate must be manifested in order to maintain a balance. If the 


Page 3 from 7:  Back   1   2  [3]  4   5   6   7   Forward