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Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

activity by conscious and volitional effort is an attempt by open-eyed 

intelligence and foresight to attain those ends which Nature through 

untold generations has been painfully yet tirelessly struggling for. The 

deliberate co-operation of Man in the natural task of Birth Control 

represents an identification of the human will with what we may, if we 

choose, regard as the divinely appointed law of the world. We can well 

believe that the great pioneers, who, a century ago, acted in the spirit 

of this faith may have echoed the thought of Kepler when, on discovering 

his great planetary law, he exclaimed in rapture: 'O God! I think Thy 

thoughts after Thee!'" 

 

The following brief general history of the modern Birth Control movement 

is quoted from Havelock Ellis, and will be of interest to students of 

the subject: "The pioneers of modern Birth Control were English. Among 

them Malthus occupies the first place. That distinguished man, in his 

great and influential work, 'The Principles of Population,' in 1798, 

emphasized the immense importance of foresight and self-control in 

procreation, and the profound significance of birth limitation for human 

welfare. Malthus, however, relied on ascetic self-restraint, a method 

which could only appeal to the few; he had nothing to say for the 

regulation of conception in intercourse. That was suggested twenty years 

later, very cautiously by James Mill, the father of John Stuart Mill, in 

the 'Encyclopaedia Britannica.' Four years afterwards, Mill's friend, 

the Radical reformer, Francis Place, advocated this method more clearly. 

Finally, in 1831, Robert Dale Owen, the son of the great Robert Owen, 

published his 'Moral Physiology,' in which he set forth the ways of 

preventing conception; while a little later the Drysdale brothers, 

ardent and unwearying philanthropists, devoted their energies to a 

propaganda which has been spreading ever since and has now conquered the 

whole civilized world. 

 

"It was not, however, in England but in France, so often at the head of 

an advance in civilization, that Birth Control first firmly became 

established, and that the extravagantly high birth rate of earlier times 

began to fall; this happened in the first half of the nineteenth 

century, whether or not it was mainly due to voluntary control. In 

England the movement came later, and the steady decline in the English 

birth-rate, which is still proceeding, began in 1877. In the previous 

year there had been a famous prosecution of Bradlaugh and Mrs. Besant 

for disseminating pamphlets describing the methods of preventing 


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