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CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

LESSON XI 

 

THE FETICH OF THE BIRTH-RATE 

 

 

To the student of the progress of the human race the consideration of 

the state of public opinion regarding the Birth-rate of nations is of 

great interest. To the careful observer there is evident the gradual 

evolution of intelligent public opinion on this subject even in the 

comparatively short space of time in which the present generation has 

played its part on the great stage of human development. 

 

Public opinion on this subject during the period named may be said to 

have passed through three general stages. These stages are, of course, 

more clearly defined among the peoples of the most prosperous and 

intelligent countries, as for instance, in Western Europe and America, 

and particularly in England, France, and the United States. While the 

peoples of certain of these countries have passed through these stages 

somewhat more rapidly than have others, still it is perceived that each 

of these peoples have in the main followed the same general course. 

 

The first stage of this evolution of popular opinion may be said to have 

been begun about 1850, and to have ended about 1880. In this stage the 

ideal of a large and rapidly increasing birth-rate became a popular 

fetich before which all men and women were supposed to fall down and 

render worship. In this period public opinion manifested great 

satisfaction and joy in the evidences of a high and rapidly increasing 

birth-rate. It was held that this increasing birth-rate tended toward 

the success and glory of the particular nation, and incidentally to the 

race as a whole. The idea of QUANTITY was elevated to the throne of 

public favor, and the question of QUALITY was ignored or overlooked. 

 

This period was one of an unusual expansion of industry, and the rising 

birth-rate was regarded as a token that the world was destined to be 

exploited and eventually governed by the people of those nations who 

were able to demonstrate the greatest efficiency in industrial pursuits, 

and who at the same time were wise enough to increase their respective 

populations by an increasing birth-rate. The populace were excited by 

the idea of the dominance and prosperity of their own countrymen, while 

the leaders of industry were delighted with the idea of an increasing 

supply of laborers which would tend to keep down the rate of wages which 

otherwise would have reached proportions which would have interfered 

with competition with other countries. At the same time, the militarists 

were secretly delighted by the signs of an increasing supply of military 


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