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CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

material with which to build up gigantic armies. 

 

A writer on the state of public opinion on this subject during this 

period has well said: "It seemed to the more exuberant spirits that a 

vast British Empire, or a mighty Pan-German, might be expected to cover 

the whole world. France, with its low and falling birth-rate, was looked 

down at with a contempt as a decadent country inhabited with a 

degenerate population. No attempt to analyze the birth-rate, to 

ascertain what are really the biological, social, and economic 

accompaniments of a high birth-rate, made any impression on the popular 

mind. They were drowned in a general shout of exultation." 

 

But this period of uncritical optimism was followed by a natural 

reaction. The pendulum stopped in its course, and soon began to swing in 

the opposite direction. Here, about 1880, the second stage may be said 

to have begun. Public opinion began to manifest a subtle change, and 

this mental attitude was accompanied by a physical manifestation in the 

form of a decreasing birth-rate. The rate of births began to fall 

rapidly, and has continued to fall steadily since that time. 

 

The writer above quoted from says of this second period: "In France the 

birth-rate fell slowly, in Italy more rapidly, and in England and 

Prussia still more rapidly. As, however, the fall began earliest in 

France, the birth-rate was lower there than in the other countries 

named. For the same reason it was lower in England than in Prussia, 

although England stands in this respect at almost exactly the same 

distance from Prussia today (1917) as thirty years ago, the fall having 

occurred at the same rate in both countries. It is quite possible that 

in the future it may become more rapid in Prussia than in England, for 

the birth-rate of Berlin is lower than the birth-rate of London, and 

urbanization is proceeding at a more rapid rate in Germany than in 

England." 

 

It is not difficult to arrive at the psychological reason underlying 

this great change in public opinion, as manifested in this second stage. 

In the first place, the wonderful era of world-expansion was arrested, 

by natural causes well understood by students of sociology. The 

ambitious dreams of world-empires were rudely interrupted. Moreover, 

public opinion was being affected by a quiet education along the lines 

of sociology and economics. 

 

The working classes began to perceive, on the one hand, the tendency of 

overpopulation to hold down, or even decrease, the scale of wages. The 

evils of over-production, and of under-consumption were dimly perceived. 


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