Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

And, on the other hand, the capitalists began to perceive that another 

factor was at work--one which they had failed to include in their 

optimistic calculations. Instead of the cheaper wage rate which they had 

expected by reason of the over-abundance of human material, they found 

that the growth of popular education in the democratic countries had 

caused the working classes to demand greater comforts of life, and to 

oppose the cheapening of human labor. And at the same time, the masses 

began to revolt against the idea of raising children to become "cannon 

fodder" for ambitious autocratic rulers. The masses began to protest 

against selling their labor and their lives so cheaply. 

 

These changed viewpoints of the working classes began to result in 

attempts on their part to form associations to resist the tendency on 

the part of capitalists to force down the scale of wages to fit the 

increased population. Trade unions flourished and became powerful, and 

the same impulse carried many into the ranks of socialism, and still 

beyond into the fold of anarchism and syndicalism. And, here note this 

significant fact, with these new perceptions and these new movements 

among the masses, THE BIRTH-RATE BEGAN TO FALL RAPIDLY. 

 

The writer above quoted from says of this period: "The pessimists were 

faced by horrors on both sides. On the one hand, they saw that the 

ever-increasing rate of human production which seemed to them the 

essential condition of national, social, even moral progress, had not 

only stopped but was steadily diminishing. On the other hand, they saw 

that, even so far as it was maintained, it involved, under modern 

conditions, nothing but social commotion and economic disturbance. There 

are still many pessimists of this class alive among us even today, alike 

in England and Germany, but a new generation is growing up, and this 

question is now entering another phase." 

 

It would seem that the race is now well started in the third period, 

phase, or stage of this conception of the birth-rate. Even the Great War 

is not likely to seriously interrupt its ultimate progress, though 

conditions in all civilized countries will unquestionably be disturbed 

by the unusual conditions now prevailing and caused by the great 

conflict. The spirit of this third stage seems to be that the Truth is 

to be found between the two extremes, viz.: (1) the extreme of passive 

optimism of the first stage; and (2) the extreme of passive pessimism of 

the second stage. It realizes that there is excellent ground for hope in 

better things; but it equally realizes that hope alone is vain, and will 


Page 3 from 10:  Back   1   2  [3]  4   5   6   7   8   9   10   Forward