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Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

are represented as entering an empty earth which it is their business 

to populate diligently. So it came about that for this morality, still 

innocent of eugenics, recklessness was almost a virtue. Children were 

held to be given by God; if they died or were afflicted by congenital 

disease, it was the dispensation of God, and, whatever imprudence the 

parents might commit, the pathetic faith still ruled that "God will 

provide." 

 

But in the new morality it is realized that in these matters Divine 

action can only be made manifest in human action, that is to say through 

the operation of our own enlightened reason and resolved will. Prudence, 

foresight, self-restraint--virtues which old morality looked down upon 

with benevolent contempt--assume a position of first importance. In the 

eyes of the new morality the ideal woman is no longer the meek drudge 

condemned to endless and often ineffectual child-bearing, but the free 

and instructed woman, able to look before and after, trained in a sense 

of responsibility alike to herself and to the race, and determined to 

have no children but the best. 

 

Such were the two moralities which came into conflict during the 

nineteenth century. They are irreconcilable and each firmly rooted, one 

in ancient religion and tradition, the other in progressive science and 

reason. Nothing was possible in such a clash of opposing ideas but a 

feeble and confused compromise such as we find still prevailing in 

various countries of Old Europe. This is not a satisfactory solution, 

however inevitable, and is especially unsatisfactory by the consequent 

obscurantism which placed difficulties in the way of spreading a 

knowledge of the methods of Birth Control among the masses of the 

population. For the result has been that while the more enlightened and 

educated have exercised a control over the size of their families, the 

poorer and more ignorant--those who should have been offered every 

facility and encouragement to follow in the same path--have been left, 

through a conspiracy of silence, to carry on helplessly the bad customs 

of their forefathers. This social neglect has had the result that the 

superior family stocks have been tampered by the recklessness of the 

inferior stocks. 

 

In America, we find the two moralities in active conflict today. Until 

recently America has meekly accepted at the hand of Old Europe the 

traditional prescription. On the surface, the ancient morality had been 

complacently, almost unquestionably, accepted in America, even to the 

extent of tacitly permitting the existence of a vast extension of 


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