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Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

rendered invulnerable.' But Gruber's estimate is entirely fallacious. 

German births have fallen, roughly speaking, about 1 per 1,000 of the 

population, every year since the beginning of the century, and it would 

be equally reasonable to estimate that if they continue to fall at the 

present rate (which we cannot, of course, anticipate) births will 

altogether have ceased in Germany before the end of the century. The 

German birth-rate reached its climax forty years ago (1871-1880) with 

40.7 per 1,000; in 1906 it was 34 per 1,000; in 1909 it was 31 per 

1,000; in 1912 it was 28 per 1,000; in an almost measurable period of 

time, in all probability before the end of the century, it will have 

reached the same low level as that of France, when there will be but 

little difference between the 'invulnerability' of France and of 

Germany, a consummation which, for the world's sake, is far more 

devoutly to be wished than that anticipated by Gruber." 

 

Writers of Teutonic sympathies have asserted that the aggressive 

attitude of Germany at the beginning of the Great War was to be 

legitimately explained and apologized for on the ground that the War was 

the inevitable expansive outcome of the abnormally high birth-rate of 

Germany in recent times. Dr. Dernburg, the German statesman, said not 

very long ago: "The expansion of the German nation has been so 

extraordinary during the past twenty-five years that the conditions 

existing before the war had become insupportable." Another writer has 

said: "Of later years there has arisen a movement among German women for 

bringing abortion into honor and repute, so that it may be carried out 

openly and with the aid of the best physicians. This movement has been 

supported by lawyers and social reformers of high position." 

 

Thus, it would seem that a birth-rate stimulated by unusual 

circumstances or by deliberate State encouragement, seemingly draws upon 

it the operation of natural laws which tend to increase its death-rate 

by War, as well as by an increased number of abortions, and an increased 

death-rate. It would seem as natural laws operate to bring down the 

population to normal by war if the other factors do not operate 

sufficiently rapidly and efficiently. 

 

Havelock Ellis makes the following interesting statement: "If we survey 

the belligerent nations in the war we may say that those who took the 

initiative in drawing it on, or at all events were most prepared to 

welcome it, were Germany, Austria, Serbia, and Russia--all nations with 

a high birth-rate, and in which the fall of the birth-rate has not yet 


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