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CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

LESSON XII 

 

THE ARGUMENT FOR BIRTH CONTROL 

 

 

Let us now consider the general and special arguments advanced in favor 

of rational and scientific Birth Control, as stated by the advocates 

thereof. 

 

GENERAL ARGUMENT. The general argument in favor of Birth Control may 

well be begun by the statement that rational and scientific Birth 

Control is not the fixing upon the race of a new and unfamiliar practice 

or policy, but is rather the scientific correction of a practice and 

policy which is now followed by the majority of married persons in 

civilized countries, though in a bungling, unscientific, and frequently 

a harmful manner. The modern advocates of scientific methods of Birth 

Control seek to replace these bungling, unscientific, and frequently 

harmful methods by sane, scientific, harmless methods, approved of by 

capable physicians and other experienced and capable authorities, and 

under the sanction of the law rather than contrary to it. 

 

The advocates of Birth Control seek to place upon a scientific basis, 

under cover and protection of the law, a subject which heretofore has 

been but imperfectly known, and more imperfectly practiced in some form 

by the majority of married couples, and which has heretofore been under 

condemnation of the law so far as concerned the actual dissemination of 

information concerning methods of contraception. They hold that it is 

the veriest hypocrisy to pretend ignorance of the fact that the great 

majority of married couples in civilized communities know and practice 

to some extent contraceptive methods--usually imperfectly and 

bunglingly, it must be added. 

 

One has but to consider the families of married couples, and to count 

their children, to become aware that at least some form of contraception 

has been known and practiced in many cases. This is particularly true of 

the more intelligent and cultured members of civilized society, among 

whom we find large families of children to be the exception, and small 

families to be the general rule. Among the less intelligent and 

uncultured classes the reverse of this condition is found. 

 

It is hypocritical folly to assert that these small families to be found 

among the more intelligent classes of society are due to the fact that 

the husbands and wives are physically incapable of procreating 

off-spring--the mere suggestion produces an incredulous smile from the 

reader. No one who is acquainted with the habits and customs of married 

people would in good faith offer such an explanation. Rather is it 

tacitly acknowledged by all thinking persons that such married couples 


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