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Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

the general idea, and without positively taking the stand that the 

burden of the proof in the argument concerning Birth Control rested upon 

those opposing the idea, have practically assumed that position. They 

claim that the right to Birth Control is so self-evident, and its 

application so generally recognized (though usually sought to be 

smothered with silence) that the case in favor of Birth Control is 

really quite apparent to anyone seriously considering the same without 

prejudice. The opposing side of the question is held by them to be 

represented principally by statements based on prejudice and 

disingenuous statements, which are capable of being turned against those 

advancing them. 

 

And, the present writer, likewise is of the opinion that the strongest 

possible case for Birth Control is presented in the answer to the 

arguments advanced by the opponents thereof. But, before proceeding to 

the latter phase of the argument, it may be well to examine briefly the 

several leading points of argument advanced by the advocates of rational 

and scientific Birth Control, in order to clear the way for the answers 

to the opposite side of the question. The reader is, therefore, invited 

to consider the said points, briefly presented in the following 

paragraphs: 

 

BIRTH CONTROL ENCOURAGES MARRIAGE. The advocates of Birth Control hold 

that a scientific knowledge of contraception would speedily result in a 

large increase of marriages, particularly among persons of limited 

incomes. Persons who have not been able to accumulate the "little nest 

egg" which prudent persons consider a requisite on the part of those 

contemplating marriage and the responsibilities of rearing a family of 

children, are in many cases caused to hesitate about contracting 

marriage, and often relinquish the idea altogether. Many of these 

persons are well adapted for marriage, being of the domestic temperament 

and having the home ideal prominent in their mental makeup. 

 

The increasing number of bachelors and unmarried women past thirty years 

of age, who are in evidence in all large centers of population at the 

present time, is undoubtedly due to a great extent to the fear on the 

part of these men and women regarding the proper support of a family of 

children. Many men and women feel that the man is able to earn enough to 

support himself and wife comfortably, by the exercise of economy, but 

that the said earnings are not sufficient to provide properly for a 

family of children. Some would be willing to have one or two children, 

born after the couple have well established themselves, but are 


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