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CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

LESSON XIII 

 

THE ARGUMENT AGAINST BIRTH CONTROL 

 

 

The argument against Birth Control, urged by those who are opposed to 

the dissemination of scientific information on the subject, may be 

reduced to a few general points. These points of objection I shall now 

state, together with the rejoinder to each as given by the advocates of 

the proposition. I think that these points cover the main argument 

advanced against Birth Control, and I shall endeavor to state them as 

fully and as fairly as possible. 

 

OPPOSED TO RELIGIOUS TEACHINGS. One of the most common arguments 

advanced against Birth Control is the one which holds that the idea is 

opposed to religious teachings. The statement, however, is usually made 

in a vague general way, the charge of "irreligious" being hurled without 

explanation, and usually without any attempt to show any proof of the 

accusation. 

 

As a matter of fact, as the advocates of Birth Control have pointed out, 

there is nothing whatsoever in the New Testament which in fairness may 

be construed as indicating Birth Control as sinful; in fact, it has been 

frequently asserted by authorities on the subject that there is nothing 

to be found in either the Old Testament or the New Testament which 

directly or indirectly prohibits the limitation of offspring, or which 

encourages the production of an unlimited number of children regardless 

of all other conditions. 

 

Nor do the majority of the various religious denominations seem to have 

in their statements of doctrine and living anything in the nature of 

prohibition along the lines indicated above. It is true, however, that 

the Roman Catholic Church does quite positively, and vigorously, 

condemn and prohibit the use of contraceptive methods among its members; 

and I have been informed that its priests place such methods in the 

category of methods producing abortion, both being regarded as 

practically identical with infanticide. I have been informed, however, 

that in this Church the restriction of marital relations to certain 

periods of the month in which conception is held to be not so likely to 

be effected, with abstinence at other periods, is a method of limiting 

offspring that does not come under the ban, particularly if there be a 

reasonable excuse offered for the desire to limit the size of the 

family; though, as a rule, even such method is frowned upon unless the 

reasonable excuse be forthcoming. 

 

In the case of members of the Catholic Church--and these only--there may 

seem to be warrant for the objection to Birth Control as "contrary to 

religion," it being assumed that the teachings and rules of the Church 


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