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Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

process in which men's minds and wills had no part. To those holding it, 

knowledge of Nature was still too imperfect for the recognition of the 

fact that the whole course of the world's natural history has been an 

erection of barrier against wholesale and indiscriminate reproduction. 

Thus it came about that under the old dispensation, which is now forever 

passing away, to have as many children as possible and to have them as 

often as possible--providing that certain ritual prescriptions were 

fulfilled--seemed to be a religious duty. 

 

Today the conditions have altogether altered, and even our own feelings 

have altered. We no longer feel with the ancient Hebrew who bequeathed 

his ideals, though not his practices, to Christendom, that to have as 

many wives and concubines and as large a family as possible is both 

natural and virtuous and in the best interests of religion. We realize, 

moreover, that such claimed Divine Commands were the expression of the 

prophets and rulers of the people to whom they were addressed, and in 

accordance with the ideals concerning race-betterment which were held by 

these self-constituted authorities. 

 

To the educated men and women of today, it is seen that these ideals of 

human-betterment (no longer imposed upon the people under the guise of 

Divine Commands, but rather by an appeal to their reason and judgment) 

are no longer based upon the sanctification of the impulse of the 

moment, but rather involve restraint of the impulse of the moment as 

taught by the lessons of foresight and regard for the future which the 

race has received. We no longer believe that we are divinely ordered to 

be reckless, or that God commands us to have children who, as we 

ourselves know, are fatally condemned to disease or premature death. 

Matters which we formerly believed to be regulated only by Providence, 

are now seen to be properly regulated by the providence, prudence, 

foresight, and self-restraint of men themselves. These characteristics 

are those of moral men, and those persons who lack these characteristics 

are condemned by our social order to be reckoned among the dregs of 

mankind. Our social order is one in which the sphere of procreation 

could not be reached or maintained by the systematic control of 

offspring. 

 

More and more is Religion perceived to be more than a mere matter of the 

observance of certain ritual and ceremonies, or the belief in certain 

dogmas. More and more is true religion seen to be vitally concerned and 

bound up with the relations of man to man, and the welfare of society in 


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