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Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

are conveyed to the Uterus or Womb, with which the tubes are connected 

and into which they open at its upper and large end. 

 

THE PELVIS is that bony arch in the cavity of which are contained the 

internal sex organs of the woman. The Pelvis is a bony basin which holds 

and supports the pelvic organs, and is composed of three important 

parts, as follows: (1) The Sacrum, consisting of five sections of the 

vertebral column, or spine, fused together so as to constitute the solid 

part of the lower spine and the back of the Pelvis; (2) the two 

Hip-Bones, one on each side of the Pelvis; (3) the Pubic Arch, or the 

front part of the Pelvis, formed by the junction of the two Hip-Bones in 

front. Attached to the Hip-Bones are the thighs, and also the large 

Gluteal Muscles which constitute the buttocks, or "seat." 

 

The Pelvis of the woman is quite different from that of the man. It is 

shallower and wider, and lighter in structure than that of the male, and 

the margins of the Hip-Bones are more widely separated, thus making the 

hips of the woman far more prominent than those of the man. Also, the 

Sacrum is shorter than that of the man, and the Pubic Arch wider and 

more rounded than his. This difference in the bony structure is made 

necessary by the demand for larger space in the female Pelvis required 

for the purposes of childbirth. These differences are not so perceptible 

in childhood, but become marked and pronounced at puberty. 

 

 

 

 


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