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CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

there is rather great wonder and amazement accompanied by the feeling of 

deep sorrow. 

 

It cannot be honestly denied that in our present age, and period of 

modern civilization, and particularly among the Anglo-Saxon branch of 

the race, the question of the sex functions is associated with impurity, 

at least so far as the popular mind is concerned. In previous 

civilizations the subject was accorded its proper place, and was 

discussed sanely and thoughtfully, without any sense of shame or 

impurity. The Middle Age ideals of celibacy and asceticism brought about 

the public conception of the human body as a thing impure--something to 

be modified, tortured, subdued and reviled; and a corresponding 

conception of sex as a vile, impure thing above which the pure in heart 

rose entirely and completely, and which those of a lesser spiritual 

ideal were permitted to indulge with a due sense of their degradation 

and weakness. It was considered a most worthy thing to lead an ascetic 

life with its accompaniment of disdain and punishment of the body. It 

was considered most pious and spiritual to forego the ordinary human 

relations of sex, marriage and parenthood. From these distorted 

conceptions naturally evolved the idea that sex, and all connected with 

it, was a subject unclean and impure in itself, and to be avoided in 

thought, conversation and writing. Not only the ordinary sex relations 

of human life were placed under this taboo, but also the phenomena of 

birth and parenthood. Not only did these incidents of life grow to be 

considered impure, but they became that which to many was still worse, 

that is to say, they became to be regarded as "not respectable." 

 

Ignorance regarding the plain elementary facts of sexual physiology is 

undoubtedly the cause not only of much immorality among young people of 

both sexes, but also of many unhappy and inharmonious marriages. The 

intelligent portion of our race is now beginning to realize very keenly 

the fact that the first requisite of sane marital relations and 

intelligent parenthood is a practical and clear knowledge of the 

physiology of sex; education concerning the sexual organism, its laws, 

its functions, its normal and healthy conditions, its anatomy, its 

physiology and hygiene. 

 

The average physician of experience in general or special practice can 

tell tales of almost incredible ignorance on the part of young women who 

have recently entered into the relationship of marriage. In some cases 

the ignorance is more than a mere absence of knowledge--it consists too 


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