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Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

are concealed within the Labia Majora, or "outer lips," and are seen 

only when the latter are parted. 

 

THE CLITORIS is a small organ, about an inch in length, situated at the 

upper part of the Labia Minora or "inner lips," and usually being partly 

or wholly covered by the upper borders thereof. At its extremity it has 

a small rounded enlargement which is extremely sensitive and excitable, 

and which is the principal seat of sensation in the woman's sexual 

organism. 

 

THE MEATUS URINARIUS is the orifice of the urethra of the woman, the 

purpose of which is to afford an exit for the urine. It is located about 

an inch below the Clitoris and is just above the Vaginal Orifice. It is 

a common error among uninformed women that the urine passes out through 

the Vagina; but this, of course, is incorrect, as the two canals and 

their respective orifices are entirely separate from each other, though 

situated closely together. 

 

THE VAGINAL ORIFICE is the outer entrance to the Vagina, or Vaginal 

Canal or Channel. This orifice is located just below the Meatus 

Urinarius. In the virgin it is usually partly closed by what is known as 

"THE HYMEN," (vulgarly known as the "maiden head"), although in many 

cases the latter is absent even in the case of young girl infants. It 

was formerly regarded as an infallible sign of virginity, and its 

absence was regarded as a proof that virginity was lacking. But this old 

superstition is passing away, for science has shown that the Hymen is 

often absent even in the case of young children and infants, and, on the 

other hand, is sometimes present after several years of married life, 

and even during pregnancy. Much unhappiness has been caused in some 

cases where the husband has doubted the virginity of his wife because of 

the absence of the Hymen, but consultation with a capable physician 

usually removes this misunderstanding. 

 

The Hymen is a membranous fold, sometimes circular in shape, with an 

opening in the center, though in other cases it extends only across the 

lower part of the orifice. The opening in the center is for the purpose 

of allowing the menstrual blood and the other secretions of Uterus and 

Vagina to flow through. In a few cases this opening is absent, the Hymen 

being what is called "imperforate"; in which case the girl experiences 

difficulty when menstruation begins, and a physician is required to make 

a slit or opening in it. In some girls and women the Hymen is quite 

tough, while in others it is very thin and is easily broken. In the 

latter cases the young girl frequently breaks the membrane during 


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