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Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

expelling the child with but slight labor at the time of delivery. 

 

The Uterus is located just behind and slightly above the bladder, and is 

supported by eight ligaments which, in a healthy condition, hold it 

firmly and easily in place. Displacements of the Uterus are due to the 

weakening or relaxing of some or all of these ligaments, generally 

caused by general weakness or else by excessive physical exercise or 

labor. The principal DISPLACEMENTS OF THE UTERUS are as follows: 

Prolapsus, or lowering of the womb in the vagina; Antroversion, or the 

bending forward of the womb; Anteflexion, or the "doubling up" of the 

womb FORWARD on itself; Retroversion, or the bending backward of the 

womb; and Retroflexion, or the "doubling up" of the womb BACKWARD on 

itself. Extreme degrees of the last four mentioned forms of displacement 

often interfere with impregnation. 

 

The internal surface of the Uterus is lined with mucous membrane 

thickly studded with minute hairlike cells which manifest continuous 

motion. This motion, in the lower part of the womb, is in the direction 

of the fundus or upper part of the womb; in the upper part of the womb, 

the motion is in the opposite direction; the purpose of these opposing 

movements being to carry the male elements toward that portion of the 

womb into which the Fallopian Tubes discharge the products of the 

Ovaries, as we shall see presently. 

 

The Uterus is supplied with follicles around its neck which secrete a 

very firm, adhesive mucus substance, which serves as a gate or door 

across the mouth of the womb during the period of pregnancy, and which 

also serves to prevent the accidental displacement of the ovum or egg. 

During and just after menstruation, the Uterus becomes enlarged and more 

vascular. During pregnancy, it largely increases in weight. After 

delivery, it resumes its normal size, but the cavity is larger than 

before conception. In old age, it becomes atrophied and denser in 

structure. 

 

THE FALLOPIAN TUBES are the ducts of the Ovaries, and serve to convey 

the ova, or eggs, from the Ovaries to the cavity in the Uterus. They are 

two in number, one on each side, each tube being about four inches in 

length. They extend from either side of the fundus of the womb, through 

the broad ligaments which hold them and the Ovaries in position until 

they communicate with the Ovaries. They are lined with a membrane 

composed of the same kind of peculiar hair-like cells which are found in 

the lining of the womb, the purpose in this case being to urge forward 

the ova or eggs toward the Uterus. 


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