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Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

 

At the ovarian end of the tubes the latter expand into a fringed, 

trumpet-shaped extremity, the fringe being known as "the fimbria." The 

tubes are only about one-sixteenth of an inch in diameter, and their 

small caliber makes it easy for them to clog up as the result of slight 

inflammation, or to become clogged up or sealed at their mouths or 

openings, thus causing sterility or inability of the woman to conceive. 

If the tubes are clogged, or sealed up, it of course is impossible for 

the ova or eggs to reach the uterus. 

 

THE OVARIES are the two oval-shaped bodies lying one on either side of 

the Uterus. In them the ova, or eggs, are formed. They are each about 

one and one-half inches long, about one inch wide, and about one-half an 

inch thick. In addition to their attachment to the broad ligament, they 

are held in position by folds or ligaments running to the fundus of the 

Uterus and to the fimbriated extremities of the Fallopian Tubes. The 

Ovaries are covered by a dense, firm coating which encloses a soft 

fibrous tissue, abundantly supplied with blood-vessels, which is called 

the stroma. Imbedded in the mesh-like tissue of the stroma are found 

numerous small, round, transparent vesicles, in various stages of 

development, known as the Graafian follicles, which are lined with a 

layer of peculiar granular cells. These Graafian follicles are the 

receptacles or sacs which contain the ova, or eggs, which constitute the 

female reproductive germ. Each vesicle contains a single ovum or egg. 

 

 

Summary. 

 

From the foregoing, it is seen that we may enumerate the sex organs of 

the woman as follows, proceeding from the external to the internal 

organism: First, the Mons Veneris, or prominent eminence above the more 

important external sex organs; then the Labia Majora, or large outer 

"lips" or folds, which are plainly discernable to the ordinary view; 

then the Labia Minora, or smaller inner "lips" or folds, and the 

Clitoris or small sensitive organ, and the Meatus Urinarius or urinary 

orifice, all of which are discernable only when the folds of the Labia 

Majora are parted or opened. Then, proceeding upward and backward from 

the Vaginal Orifice, we find the Vagina, or channel or canal leading to 

the Uterus or Womb; then we find the Uterus or Womb at the upper end of 

the canal or channel of the Vagina. Then extending from either side of 

the Uterus or Womb we find those two important sets of organs known as 

the Fallopian Tubes, and the Ovaries, respectively. The Ovaries 

discharge their ova, or eggs, into the Fallopian Tubes, from whence they 


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