Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

 

That the influence exerted by a general knowledge of scientific methods 

of Birth Control would suffice to entirely abolish prostitution it is 

foolish to maintain, although it would undoubtedly tend to decrease the 

social evil. And even the partial elimination of prostitution would be 

in the interests of general morality, not only in the direction of 

lessening the brutal demand of women to serve in the ranks of 

prostitution, but also in many other ways of importance to society as a 

whole. The decrease of venereal disease would follow a decrease in 

prostitution caused by a general knowledge and practice of scientific 

methods of Birth Control on the part of married people; and it must be 

remembered that venereal disease spreads far beyond the patrons of 

prostitution and is a perpetual menace to others who may become innocent 

victims. And any influence that serves to decrease prostitution and the 

spread of venereal disease, must be placed in the category of "moral," 

and certainly not in the opposite one. 

 

The objection is frequently heard that the general knowledge of 

scientific methods of contraception would lead to increased illicit 

relations among unmarried persons, particularly among the young people. 

This argument is apparently based upon the belief, or fear, that the 

fear of conception is the only thing which prevents many persons from 

indulging in illicit relations. It assumes that a large portion of our 

womankind are chaste simply because of fear of pregnancy; and that this 

fear once removed these women would at once plunge into such relations. 

In other words, it assumes that mentally and in spirit these women are 

already unchaste, but are restrained from physical unchastity by reason 

of the fear of conception. 

 

The answer of the advocates of Birth Control takes direct issue with the 

above contention. On the contrary, it asserts that the chastity of our 

women is the result of their general training, education, heredity, 

observance of the accepted customs and standards of their community, 

religious and moral training, etc. The woman who is chaste simply 

through fear, usually manages to allay that fear in one way or another, 

often by mistaken methods which work great harm to the woman and the 

community in general. The general knowledge of scientific contraceptive 

methods might result in such women manifesting their inclinations and 

desires in a "safer" manner, but this "safety" would not consist of 

protection against conception (for that they already think they have) 

but rather of a protection against the dangers of abortion and similar 


Page 1 from 7: [1]  2   3   4   5   6   7   Forward