Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

evil practices. 

 

Some of the writers go further in this matter, as for instance Dr. 

Robinson, who says: "If some women are bound to have illicit relations, 

is it not better that they should know the use of scientific preventives 

than that they should become pregnant, disgracing and ostracising 

themselves, and their families; or that they should subject themselves 

to the degradation and risks of an abortion; or failing this, take 

carbolic acid or bichloride, jump into the river, or throw themselves 

under the wheels of a running train?" 

 

The objection to Birth Control on the ground that it would increase 

illicit relations among men and women by means of removing the fear of 

physical consequences, seems to many careful thinkers to be akin to the 

old objection (now happily passing away) to the dissemination of the 

knowledge of the treatment of venereal diseases, and to the public cure 

of such diseases, on the ground that by so doing a part of the fear 

concerning illicit relations was removed, and thereby illicit relations 

actually encouraged. The result of this fallacious argument was the 

enormous spread of venereal diseases, to the great hurt of the race; and 

the encouragement of quacks and charlatans who fattened on the gains 

received from the sufferers from this class of complaints. The argument 

against Birth Control on similar grounds will be seen to be equally 

fallacious, and capable of equally evil consequences, if the matter be 

fairly and carefully considered. 

 

Illicit relations, if prevented or regulated at all by society, must be 

so regulated or prevented by other means than fear of conception. Such 

fear, though it may deter for a short time, will usually be overcome in 

time if the desire and temptation remain sufficiently strong. It is 

doubtful whether any considerable number of women remain chaste for any 

length of time simply by reason of fear of conception. If such fear be 

the only remaining deterring factor, it will usually be swept away in 

time under continued temptation, opportunity, and desire. Chastity and 

virtue must have a far more solid foundation than such fear; and 

experience repeatedly shows that such fear is but as shifting sand 

sought to be employed as a foundation for the structure of chastity. 

 

There is no reason whatsoever for believing that the scientific 

knowledge of contraceptive methods, if generally possessed by married 

people under the sanction of the law and society, would result in any 

more cases of illicit relations than exist at the present time. It 


Page 2 from 7:  Back   1  [2]  3   4   5   6   7   Forward