Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

making this broad assertion I, of course, have in mind not only the 

modern methods urged by the advocates of scientific contraception, but 

also the "control" and regulation observed by married persons in either 

total abstinence from the marital relations for a stated time, or else 

the abstinence from such relations during certain portions of the lunar 

month, the latter method (somewhat uncertain, however, in its efficacy 

in some cases) being apparently favored by certain ecclesiastical 

authorities as the "only moral" method. 

 

In view of the above facts, which might be enlarged and extended if 

necessary, it is seen that as soon as man rises above the level of the 

beast or savage--as soon as he begins to manifest culture and 

civilization--he begins to exercise a certain "control" over the 

procreative FUNCTION, and in the direction of the limitation of the 

size of his family of offspring. The contention of the modern advocates 

of scientific Birth Control is that the "new ideas" on the subject are 

simply a natural and inevitable evolution from the degrees of "control" 

which man has exercised since the time he emerged from savagery. The 

later developments are no more "unnatural" than the earlier--nor the 

accepted methods and forms any more "natural" than those which are now 

opposed by the more conservative elements of society. 

 

When anyone begins to talk about things being "natural" or "unnatural," 

respectively, he should tread softly and watch his steps carefully. For 

at every step he treads upon instances of "unnatural" modes and methods 

of living. Strictly speaking, it is "unnatural" to wear clothes, or to 

cook food, or to live in houses, or to ride in conveyances or on 

horseback. All of these things have been evolved by the use of intellect 

and reason, and are not instinctive or "natural" to man. Birds build 

nests, wasps build shelter, hornets build homes, bees build honey-combs, 

worms build cocoons, snails build shells--all by instinct and 

"naturally"--and the young of such species do not have to be TAUGHT how 

to do these things. But the young of the human race requires to be 

taught such things as above mentioned as having been evolved by man in 

the course of his rise from savagery--instinct will not do it for them. 

And all of these things outside the plane of instinct, and within the 

plane of intellect, cannot be called "natural" in the strict sense of 

the term. 

 

You think that I am exaggerating the matter, perhaps. Well, then, I ask 

you to consider the meaning of the two terms which I have employed so 


Page 6 from 7:  Back   1   2   3   4   5  [6]  7   Forward