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Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

vitality in the French, while, in fact, their own birth-rate has been 

falling more rapidly than that of France. 

 

Nor is it true that a falling birth-rate means a falling population. The 

French birth-rate has been steadily falling for a number of years, yet 

the French population has been steadily increasing all the time, though 

less rapidly than it would had not the death-rate been abnormally high. 

It is not the number of babies born that counts, but the net result in 

surviving children. An enormous number of babies are born in China; but 

an enormous number die while still babies. So that it is better to have 

a few babies of good quality than a large number of indifferent quality, 

for the falling birth-rate is more than compensated by the falling 

death-rate. In England, as the statistics show, while the birth-rate is 

steadily falling, the population has been steadily growing. 

 

Small families and a falling death-rate are not merely no evil--they are 

a positive good. They are a gain for humanity. They represent an 

evolutionary rise in Nature and a higher stage in civilization. We are 

here in the presence of a great fundamental principle of progress which 

has been working through life from the beginning. 

 

At the beginning of life on the earth, reproduction ran riot. Of one 

minute organism it is estimated that, if its reproduction were not 

checked by death or destruction, in thirty days it would form a mass a 

million times larger than the sun. The conger-eel lays fifteen million 

eggs, and if they all grew up, and reproduced themselves on the same 

scale, in two years the whole sea would become a wriggling mass of eels. 

As we approach the higher forms of life, reproduction gradually dies 

down. The animals nearest to man produce few offspring, but they 

surround them with parental care, until they are able to lead 

independent lives with a fair chance of surviving. The whole process may 

be regarded as a mechanism for slowly subordinating quantity to quality, 

and to promoting the evolution of life to even higher stages. 

 

This process, which is plain to see on the largest scale throughout 

living nature, may be more minutely studied, as it acts within a 

narrower range, in the human species. Here we statistically formulate it 

in the terms of birth-rate and death-rate; by the mutual relationship of 

the two courses of the birth-rate and death-rate we are able to estimate 

the evolutionary rank of a nation, and the degree in which it has 

succeeded in subordinating the primitive standard of quantity to the 

higher and later standard of quality. 


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