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CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

procreation only, and who assert that the maintenance of continence 

secures not only the greater strength and better health, but greater 

happiness also. * * * While the results of our investigations do not 

enable us to assert that it is the true theory, we are yet prepared to 

say that it is worthy of thoughtful consideration. If it is possible for 

married people to maintain absolute continence for a period of six 

months or a year, it must be conceded that it would be possible to 

extend that time to a longer period. The maintenance of this theory 

would require such a degree of self-control as is far beyond the 

possession of the great mass of humanity. We fear, also, that there are 

but few, even if they entered upon a life union with such thought and 

intention, who would be willing to maintain their principles for any 

considerable period. * * * The other theory, and that which many men 

and women who are eminent for their learning and religious life hold to 

be the correct theory, is that while no one has a right to enter upon 

the marriage relation with the fixed purpose of evading the duty of 

parenthood, yet that procreation is not the only high and holy purpose 

which God has had in view in establishing the marriage relation, but 

that the act of sexual congress may be indulged in between husband and 

wife for the purpose of expressing their personal endearments, and for 

quickening those affections and tender feelings which are calculated to 

render home the place of blessing and good which God intended. * * * It 

is held by those who advocate this theory, that while it would be 

possible to restrict the exercise of the reproductive functions to the 

single purpose of procreation, yet in the great majority of instances 

the effort to live by that theory would generally result in marital 

unhappiness. * * * Due regard is not only to be paid to the perpetuity 

of the race, but to the well-being and perpetuity of the individual." 

 

The advocates of continence, except for the purpose of procreation, 

advance many arguments and evidence to justify their contention that 

this is the only course justified by Nature and Morality. We need not 

present this argument here, for it is outside the particular question 

now under consideration. However, in all fairness and justice, there 

should be presented here the general outline of their argument that 

there is no rational basis for the widely accepted idea that abstinence 

from sexual relations is in any way harmful or detrimental to the health 

and physical well-being of the human race. 


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