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CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

have not been able to find in the studies of the physiologists that its 

retention is abnormal or unhygienic. * * * I do not conceive of a man 

suffering from the ills of continence who has been cast away on a desert 

island, with no immediate prospect of relief, and whose mind and hands 

are occupied with raising grain, catching fish for subsistence, and 

constructing a boat for escape. All that has been said of men may be 

said of women." 

 

Dr. Talmey has said: "Continence, if long continued, has been claimed to 

be the cause of impotence. But there is no valid reason for this belief. 

To prove the harmfulness of continence an analogue is brought forward 

between the atrophy of a muscle in enforced idleness and the injury to 

the sex organs in enforced abstinence. But the proof is somewhat feeble. 

The essential organs of generation are not muscles, but glands, and who 

has ever heard of a tear gland atrophying for lack of crying. * * * 

There is no valid proof of the harmfulness of total abstinence in a 

healthy individual. A perfectly healthy man is never injured by 

abstinence. At least there is no sufficient proof that he ever was; but 

there are unmistakable proofs that total abstinence does not harm the 

individual." 

 

Dr. Stockham has said: "The testes may be considered analogous to the 

salivary and lachrymal glands, in which there is no fluid secreted 

except at the demand of their respective functions. The thought of food 

makes the mouth water for a short time only, while the presence of food 

causes abundant yield of saliva. It is customary for physicians to 

assume that the spermatic secretion is analogous to bile, which, when 

once formed, must be expelled. But substitute the word 'tears' for bile, 

and you put before the mind an idea entirely different. Tears, as 

falling drops, are not essential to life and health. A man may be in 

perfect health and yet not cry once in five or even fifty years. The 

lachrymal fluid is ever present, but in such small quantities that it is 

unnoticed. Where are tears while they remain unshed? They are ever 

ready, waiting to spring forth when there is an adequate cause, but they 

do not accumulate and distress the man because they are not shed daily, 

weekly, or monthly. The component elements of the tears are prepared in 

the system, they are on hand, passing through the circulation, ready to 

mix and flow whenever they are needed; but if they mix, accumulate and 

flow without adequate cause, there is a disease of the lachrymal glands. 

While there are no exact analogies in the body, yet the tears and the 


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