Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

 

Semi-Continence. 

 

Semi-Continence (in the sense in which the term is employed herein) 

consists of the abstinence from the exercise of the procreative 

functions, while there is a partial manifestation of the sexual 

relation. Under various fanciful names, backed by as many curious 

theories, this birth-control method is practiced by very many married 

couples in this and other countries. 

 

Among the earlier advocates of this general class of birth-control 

methods was Noyes, the founder of the one-time famous Oneida Community, 

who taught the doctrine of what he called "Male Continence." The gist of 

his teaching was as follows: That the sexual relation (in its entirety) 

should be exercised solely for the purpose of reproduction, all else 

being contrary to nature. But, he held, notwithstanding this, there was 

possible and proper a certain degree of such physical relation which, 

while not opposing Nature's laws of reproduction, yet was sufficient to 

afford a complete manifestation of the "affectional desire and 

function." In other words, as a writer has expressed it, "that one might 

manifest a marked degree of sexual gratification and still remain 

continent, while feeling none of the irksome restraints of continence." 

 

Noyes claimed that his community followed this plan with satisfactory 

results, the ordinary sexual relations being manifested only when 

reproduction was specially desired and deliberately decided upon. Noyes 

claimed that in this way there was no secretion of the seminal fluid, 

and therefore no waste of the same, and no unnatural practices such 

attached to the common custom of "tricking Nature" by methods of 

preventing impregnation and conception. Parkhurst (who, as we shall see 

presently, followed Noyes) objected to the Noyes plan, claiming that "it 

necessarily stimulates into activity the generative functions of the 

sexual batteries, and this not only causes a wasteful use of sperm, but 

diverts the sexual batteries from their affectional function, 

diminishing amative attraction." 

 

In the year 1896, Dr. Alice B. Stockham, of Chicago, published a book 

called "Karezza" which has since attained an enormous sale, the leading 

principle of which seems to have been almost similar to that of Noyes, 

as above stated. The book was built around the idea previously announced 

by the same author in an earlier book, which she stated as follows: "By 

some a theory called 'secular absorption' is advanced. This involves 

intercourse without culmination." In her book "Karezza" this author 

further stated: "Karezza so consummates marriage that through the power 


Page 1 from 8: [1]  2   3   4   5   6   7   8   Forward