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Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

intervention of dress. 

 

"The exercise of the affectional function tends to satiety and 

exhaustion in the same way as all other physical or mental exercise; but 

if it is not carried to excess it is a permanent benefit. * * * The 

principle of Alphism will tend to diminish prostitution, not only by 

diminishing sexual intemperance, even if the principle is not at once 

accepted in practice to the full extent, thus diminishing the temptation 

of the present generation, and the hereditary temptation of future 

generations; but also by correcting the physiological error which has 

led astray so many, i. e., that total abstinence is not conducive to 

health, or to the highest physical pleasure, but that the ordinary 

physical relation is an essential feature in male existence. 

 

"To avoid misapprehension, these two theories should be clearly defined 

and the distinction between them explained. The doctrine of Alphism is 

confined to one principle, i. e., THE LAW OF ABSTINENCE EXCEPT FOR 

PROCREATION. Those who believe in this doctrine may be divided into 

different classes. Some believe in it as a matter of duty, to be 

enforced by precept and self-denial; and some believe in it as a matter 

of right, requiring no self-denial. In the latter is included the 

doctrine of 'Diana,' which may be defined as THE LAW OF SEXUAL 

SATISFACTION FROM SEXUAL CONTACT. In other words, Dianism is Alphism as 

the result of sexual equilibration." 

 

The general idea of Parkhurst, and those who have followed his teachings 

in some modified or adapted form, may be said to be based upon the 

following general proposition: That there is a dual function in the 

sexual relations, which may be stated as follows: (1) the function 

exercised from purely physiological causes, and which expresses the 

desire for the relation resulting in procreation; and (2) the function 

exercised from emotional causes, and which expresses what may be called 

the "affectional desire," i. e., the desire for the embrace, caress, 

fondling, and general companionship with the loved one of the other sex. 

 

The first one of these phases, i. e., the reproductive function, is 

manifested by the lower animals as well as by man, and is elemental and 

primitive in character. It is often manifested by man without the 

accompaniment of the affectional function, and at times seems to be 

almost entirely divorced from the idea of high human affection. The 

second one of these phases, i. e., the affectional function, usually 

accompanied the procreative function in the human sexual relation, at 


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